The Eastern Highlands

04 Aug 2015

The Eastern Highlands is more of a mountain range stretching from Nyanga down to Chimanimani, via Vumba, with Nyanga and Vumba being the famous ones. Nyanga has got scenic landscapes and beautiful vegetation that are so good to the eyes. Because of its unique climate Cecil John Rhodes stayed there and named it “The Little England”. Visitors will carried away with these breath views from the highest point in Zimbabwe, that is, Mt. Nyangani standing at 2592 metres above sea level. Nyanga receives more rains that anywhere else in Zimbabwe and has a unique climate all together. As much as it has the highest point it also has the longest.

Hwange

04 Aug 2015
Hwange

Named after a local Nambia chief, Hwange National Park is the largest area set aside exclusively for wildlife in Zimbabwe, occupying roughly 14,650 km2 and boasting a tremendous selection of wildlife with over 100 species of mammals and nearly 400 bird species recorded. Elephants of Hwange are world famous for their size and majesty and the park’s population is one of the largest in the world. The safari is conducted in open 4×4 vehicles with expert guides. Lunch is served at a picnic site within the park, usually at one of the many waterholes, while watching game go by.

Bulawayo – Matopos ‘Bald Heads’ (UNESCO World Heritage)

04 Aug 2015
Bulawayo – Matopos ‘Bald Heads’ (UNESCO World Heritage)

The Matopos Hills have great spiritual and cultural significance to the local people because the Great Ndebele King named Mzilikazi was buried in this park. This is as much a historical site as it is scenic as it houses spectacular granite landscapes, where views from these hilltops are breathtaking. The magnificent Matopo Hills are a range of domes, spires and balancing rock formations. Highlights include viewing Bushman rock paintings, climbing to the site of former Zimbabwe colonial master – Cecil John Rhodes’ grave, visiting to an authentic village, game viewing and rhino tracking among other interesting things. The Park includes an Intensive Protection Zone where a large population of the.

Mana Pools ‘UNESCO Natural World Heritage Site’

04 Aug 2015

From Kariba, the Zambezi River continues to carve its course towards Mana Pools. Mana Pools National Park is synonymous with the Zambezi River, elephants, lions, remoteness and wilderness. This unique park is a WORLD HERITAGE SITE, based on its wildness and beauty, together with the wide range of large mammals, over 350 bird species and aquatic wildlife. Mana Pools is one of Zimbabwe’s most popular parks, and it is easy to see why it falls into this profile. The name “Mana” means “four” in the local Shona language. This applies to the four large pools inland from the Zambezi River. These pools are the remnant ox-bow lakes that the Zambezi.

Kariba

04 Aug 2015

The Lake Kariba, with its fossilised Mopani forest rising out of the water, is famed for its splendid sunsets. Relax and enjoy the breath-taking splendour of game along the shores as the day cools, keeping an eye out for elephant, hippo and crocodile. Kariba is home to numerous species of flora and fauna and is an exciting and unique safari destination. The shoreline is over 2 000km long a rich grazing area for many species, which has in turn attracted the predatory animals that hunt these species. The lake is renowned for its tigerfish but it is also home to over 40 fish species that include nkupe, chessa, bottlenose, vundu,.

Victoria Falls –‘Mosi-oa-Tunya’ – The Smoke That Thunders

04 Aug 2015

As the Zambezi River runs its course to the Indian Ocean, it separates Zimbabwe and Zambia; and presents a spectacular sight of awe-inspiring beauty and majesty. The Zambezi River gently meander through the Southern Africa landscape, it is spectacularly interrupted as the river plummets over a knife edge cliff into a narrow chasm below. The wide basalt cliff over which the falls thunder, transforms the Zambezi from a placid river into a ferocious torrent cutting through a series of dramatic gorges. Columns of spray can be seen from miles away as, at the height of the rainy season, more than five hundred million cubic meters of water per minute plummet.

Great Zimbabwe

04 Aug 2015

The Great Zimbabwe Ruins (sometimes just called Great Zimbabwe) are sub-Saharan Africa’s most important and largest stone ruins. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1986, the large towers and structures were built out of millions of stones balanced perfectly on top of one another without the aid of mortar. Great Zimbabwe gave modern Zimbabwe its name as well as its national emblem — an eagle carved stylishly out of soapstone which was found at the ruins. Best place for archaeological enthusiasts and historians as it bears a lot of significance in Zimbabwean history. It covers an area of some 78 acres, with an estimated population of some 18,000 people at.

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